Lawmakers & Truckers Look to Make Driving Conditions Safer in Atlanta

Truck drivers are increasingly endangered due to the risk of rollover accidents on the nation's aging highways. This threat is highlighted in the Atlanta area where over 200 trucks have flipped and more than 200 people have died in Georgia because of rollovers, since 2001.

Atlanta has roadways dating back to the 1950s, but today they are faced with more traffic and semi-trucks carrying more and more freight. Many of the bridges and curves even lack adequate signs and flashing lights to warn trucks of impending rollover risks.

Although rollers account for only 3.3% of all large-truck accidents, these types of accidents have caused over half of the deaths of truck drivers and their occupants in 2012. This amounts to 300 deaths and 3,000 injuries every year.

Lawmakers are looking to fix the problem—one such solution involves raising funds to repair roads and bridges so they can handle the tons of weight which cross them each day. Results may not be forthcoming, however, as the revenue needed for such projects can easily reach into the billions of dollars. Vice president of safety policy at the Groendyke Transport trucking company in Oklahoma, Steve Niswander, emphasized that "because so many curves were made 40 years ago, they don't have the banking needed for the trucks of today."

Another means of ensuring truck driver safety could involve a regulation proposed to the White House recently by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which would mandate electronic stability control to regulate braking for large trucks. Such technology is already in use and required on SUVs, pickup trucks, and cars. The NHTSA claims that despite opposition to regulation, such technology could save the lives of thousands of truck drivers.

While these regulations are standard for European trucks, Ted Scott, director of engineering for the American Trucking Associations points out that such regulations are expensive and truck makers already install some form of stability control in roughly 70% of all new rigs. Scott instead wants the emphasis to be on removing outdated tractors without such technology from the nation's highways.

If you were involved in a trucking accident, call our Alpharetta personal injury lawyer to help file a claim for compensation. We have all the tools needed to recover the financial damages you need!